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Energy Department Names Virginia and Illinois Electric Co-ops the 2013 Wind Cooperatives of the Year

Photo of two men holding awards with a female standing in between them.

David Stuva, president and CEO of Rural Electric Convenience Cooperative; Brie Van Cleve, U.S. Department of Energy Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach manager; and Jack Reasor, president and CEO of Old Dominion Electric Cooperative

Energy Department Names Virginia and Illinois Electric Co-ops the 2013 Wind Cooperatives of the Year

Date: 3/6/2014

The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) today recognized Old Dominion Electric Cooperative (ODEC) of Virginia and the Rural Electric Convenience Cooperative (RECC) of Illinois as the 2013 Wind Cooperatives of the Year.

The awards were presented at the TechAdvantage 2014 Conference and Expo in Nashville, Tenn., to honor electric cooperatives that demonstrate outstanding leadership in advancing U.S. wind power. The two power providers were selected by a panel of judges from the wind industry, utilities, government, national laboratories and cooperatives, and were evaluated for their corporate leadership, project innovation, and benefits to customers.

ODEC has entered into four separate contracts to purchase capacity, energy and renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with wind turbine projects since 2008, adding more than 260 megawatts of capacity to their existing resource portfolio. As a wholesale power supply cooperative, ODEC generates and procures power to serve the requirements of its eleven member retail cooperatives and resells the RECs it procures to its member cooperatives and third parties.

RECC teamed up with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to provide its 5,800 customers with new sources of energy, while transforming a "brownfield" site into a source of clean, renewable energy. By installing a utility-scale turbine on the elevated section of an abandoned mine, RECC is able to capture a large amount of wind energy that is unavailable at a lower elevation. Wind speeds in central Illinois are typically slower than in northern parts of the state, so the 14-foot, 60-acre tailings pile owned by DNR gives the installation the sufficient height it needs to capture winds strong enough to power a 900-kilowatt turbine.

Several factors enhanced the project's feasibility, including clean renewable energy bond financing, a long-term lease agreement for the site with the DNR, and proximity to a RECC substation.

The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) accelerates development and facilitates deployment of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies and market-based solutions that strengthen U.S. energy security, environmental quality, and economic vitality. To learn more about EERE's Wind Program, including breaking news, research and development, and financial opportunities, please visit the Wind Program website.

This information was last updated on March 10, 2014